Todmorden Weir Minerals to ask Weir Head Office about fossil fuel divestment plans

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going into Weir_loresFollowing an unannounced visit by Climate Crime Unit Investigators on April 6th, the managing director of Weir Minerals in Todmorden has agreed to ask Weir Head Office whether the company warns shareholders of the risk attached to the Weir’s substantial investments in the fossil fuel industry, and if they have any plans for divesting from fossil fuels. Continue reading

Please sign open letter to Valley Road GP surgery if you’re fed up with being fobbed off to 111

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If you are registered with Hebden Bridge Group Practice and agree with this letter, please sign your name in the comments box – or email it if you don’t want to be publicly identified. I will add your names to the letter and deliver it to the GP surgery in a few days.

Open Letter

Dear Practice Manager and GPs

A number of patients at the Valley Road GP surgery have found that when they phone the practice for an urgent appointment they are told to call 111, who, after asking the 20 or so questions on their script, will then send a report to the GP surgery, which will then decide if a doctor will call them or see them.

This is making people very cross and anxious as often they are people with ongoing health problems who know that they need to be seen at the GP surgery.

For example, a patient susceptible to sepsis with a suspected UTI needed to see a doctor and get a urine sample checked., but was fobbed off to 111.  This is unacceptable. It is not a good thing for chronically ill and vulnerable patients.

Parents with poorly children who need to be seen urgently have found dealing with 111 to be a nightmare.

We are under the impression that GP surgeries are required to give same day appointments to patients with urgent health problems, so why are you directing them to 111? Particularly children?

People have been to the pharmacist – as we are now advised to for minor conditions – only to be told they need antibiotics which pharmacists can’t prescribe.  So then they have to phone the GP surgery where it seems the policy now is to tell them to phone 111.

This is just giving patients the runaround. And it has to be less efficient and more wasteful for the NHS than if you just told people to come into the GP surgery for an appointment.

It ends up with people going to A&E because they know at least there they will be treated. But your Clinical Commissioning Group wants to reduce the number of people going to A&E.

We urge you to abandon this daft and unhelpful policy of fobbing off your patients – who really do appreciate the good care we get when we manage to see a GP or other clinician at the GP surgery.

Regards,

Posted from here.

Hebden Bridge and other Calderdale GP practices’ patient data systems are unlawful

Hebden Bridge Group Practice and other GP practices in Calderdale use an electronic patient data system called TPP SystmOne that has an “enhanced data sharing” system that shares confidential patient data outside the GP practice eg with hospitals, care homes and community services.

Flaws in the system mean data protection is being breached as the sharing system gives access to our shared data to thousands of “authorised users” within the NHS, which is not what is supposed to happen. It should just go to whatever other NHS departments are treating you, in addition to your GP.
Continue reading

Posted from here.

Boycott Barclays, say Frackfree Planet campaigners

“Get Your Fracking Hands Off Ryedale” was the message from the Frackfree Planet picket outside the Hebden Bridge branch of Barclays Bank on Wednesday 22nd February.

Calderdale members of Frackfree Planet handed out leaflets to Barclays Bank customers and passers by, to alert them to Barclays’ ownership of Third Energy, the company that plans to frack at Kirkby Misperton In North Yorkshire. Continue reading

Posted from here.

So many revolving doors – was Bootham Park Hospital closed in the interests of patients or profits?

Bootham Park Hospital was closed at the end of September 2015 on the sudden instruction of the Care Quality Commission, following their unannounced inspection five days before the contract for running the hospital was due to be taken up by Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys mental health trust.

The inspection was apparently triggered by whistle-blowing from a ward manager who used to work for the Care Quality Commission.

Despite massive public opposition to the hurried closure – and an assurance to the Care Quality Commission from the head of Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys mental health trust that they had £2m earmarked for fixing the maintenance problems that were the reason for closing Bootham Park Hospital – the Care Quality Commission refused to budge.

None of this story makes any obvious sense. So what’s been going on?

Do fast-revolving doors between key public organisations and private health sector companies create a shadow NHS, where decisions are made in the interests of profit not patients? Continue reading

Posted from here.

New-build mental hospital for York – the murky workings of a post-democratic, privatising NHS

The sudden closure of Bootham Park Hospital in York at the end of September 2015 with just five days warning –  followed sixteen months later by the proposal for a replacement new build mental health hospital in York, provides a case study in the murky workings of a fast-privatising NHS that lacks democratic accountability

Revolving doors between the NHS and private companies mean that conflicts of interest are rife – but barely examined.

Bootham Park’s closure, on the order of the Care Quality Commission following an unannounced inspection, forced the immediate discharge or relocation of 30 inpatients  and affected 400 outpatients.

It was met by public outrage and opposition as the mental health hospital – the only one in York and the surrounding area – had been vital to the wellbeing and survival of many patients. Continue reading

Posted from Hebden Bridge, England, United Kingdom.

Preston New Road Rolling Roadside Protest – Keep Lancashire Frack Free

Today, 19th January, is the 12th day of the daily rolling roadside protest at the Preston New Road fracking site,  organised by the local residents’ Preston New Road Action Group .

Preston New Road

Preston New Road is not  like other fracking sites which can be closed completely during deliveries. It is in a residential area on the busy A583 which is part of Lancashire’s strategic road network that is used by the North West Ambulance Service in reaching “blue light” emergencies.

The Ambulances are targeted to attend 75 per cent of Category A Red 1 calls (the most time-critical, where patients are not breathing or don’t have a pulse) within 8 minutes. Even a 15-minute closure of this major local trunk road could make the difference between life and death. Continue reading

Posted from London, England, United Kingdom.